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Tag Archives: Darkseid

FINAL CRISIS | ‘New to Comics’ Review

This post was originally published on my now defunct site, New to Comics.

New to Comics is a segment where I look at various comic-books, explaining their background, reviewing them, and breaking them down for readers unfamiliar to the medium. The title is a reference to a former university project that I carried on as its own site for several years before laying it to rest.


Although I have themes planned out until the end of the year, sometimes plans change, and to round out the superhero-comic section of my mythology-focused month, I decided to switch things up by looking at Darkseid, one of the most dangerous villains in the DC Universe. Partly for something different, partly due to budgetary restrictions, this week’s comic is Final Crisis, a story I read before some time ago, but have decided to come back to as it sees Darkseid’s ultimate goal realised…

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Published by: DC Comics
Written by: Grant Morrison
Art by: J. G. Jones & Marco Rudy
Pages: 352

SPOTLIGHT CHARACTER:

DARKSEID

Real Name: Uxas
Affiliation: The New Gods
First Appearance: Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen #134 (November 1970)

Uxas began his reign of tyranny by using his devious nature to sow seeds of discontent among the Old Gods, before stealing their powers one by one. With the Old Gods wiped out, and only he and his brother remaining, Uxas became one of the first of the New Gods. But while his brother created the paradise of New Genesis under the alias of Highfather, Uxas created the hellscape known as Apokolips. Here, he raised a vile and wretched race of beings, who teetered on the brink of war with Highfather’s own purer species. To hold off all out war, the two New God Lords traded their infant sons. As a result, Darkseid’s spawn grew up to be the great hero of New Genesis, Orion, while Highfather’s son lived a tortured life where he learned to be the master escape artist Mister Miracle. With his sights now turned away from the other Gods, Darkseid has since turned his attention to Earth and discovering the Anti-Life Equation.

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Super-Heroes: The Modern Mythology

This post was originally published on my now defunct site, New to Comics.

When it comes to comic-book fans, there are certain things that many seem to have a shared interest in. The most prominent, obviously, is serialised fiction and anything superhero themed.

On top of that, there is usually an interest in science-fiction as a whole. Stories that explore the uncanny, the unexplainable and the endless possibilities of the future.

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A third potential interest, in my opinion, is mythology. This is highlighted by the fact that many superheroes have ties to myth. Marvel Comics Thor is a God adapted from Norse Mythology, and many of his supporting characters are themselves Gods (some authentic, such as Odin and Loki, others original such as Fandral, Hogun and Volstagg, more commonly known as the Warriors Three). On the DC side is Wonder Woman, a character who originated as a member of the Amazons, who are adapted from Greek mythology. Similarly, the character of Captain Marvel/Shazam is transformed by a wizard into ‘Earth’s Mightiest Mortal’, invoking various attributes of Greek mythological figures (the strength of Hercules, the wisdom of Solomon, etc.).

More enduring religions, such as Christianity, also hold sway in modern comic-book story-telling, with concepts like Heaven and Hell frequently appearing in stories featuring characters like Ghost Rider, who, as a ‘Spirit of Vengeance’ is, depending on the continuity, either an agent of Heaven or Hell.

But even ignoring the superheroes who are actual Gods, comic books relate to mythology on another level.

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Posted by on March 24, 2018 in Comic Books, What's Going On?

 

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